Insecurity

In Britain today insecurity is endemic. Our current society promotes it. There is a decrease in job security; the benefit system is now a lottery with claimants waiting for the moment when they will be sanctioned and left with no way of buying food or paying bills; families are split and spread around the country (if not the world); additionally, there is seldom a community that anyone can fall back on.

It has often been the case that governments have viewed insecurity as a useful tool in controlling the general population. This is because of a couple of basic misunderstandings. The truth is that a government’s role should NOT be one of control. Also, insecurity is only effective for control when it can be maintained at a certain level.

Once insecurity reaches a certain point it becomes something else, it becomes hopelessness, total disconnection. People who are either hopeless or disconnected are not easy to control. Governmental response to such people is to marginalise and/or criminalise them. They do this because of the first misunderstanding (the government’s role should NOT be one of control).

Over the generations the role of government has been distorted and twisted. If we look back to Athens we find something very different from “democracy” as we experience it. Not that we could, or even should, replicate it now. It had it’s own flaws and inconsistencies. But it’s intent was different. It was an attempt to make decisions for the whole community without being reliant on a system rooted in “might is right”.

“Might is right” is how you get a monarchy. You maintain your monarchy by adding some mumbo jumbo about the “divine right of kings”, and then prop it up with the “old boy’s club”.

In Britain a version of democracy was grafted on top of that. It’s not surprising that it has become a form of control that works to support those that have at the expense of those that have not.

And we come back again to insecurity. The “haves” know that their position is not secure, so they use their greater access to governmental positions to try to bolster themselves. Their understanding of the world is warped though by their financial privilege, and the belief that some people are more important than others.

At the other end of the scale, that belief is echoed, and those who have little believe they are worth less and gradually move away from mainstream society. Some are very angry, and an angry person who believes they have nothing to lose can become violent very rapidly.

This is a violence that is increasingly near to the surface. It is a violence that is unlikely to be directed to any positive end. It is an unnecessary violence and a violence that will hurt everyone. It is created by “man’s inhumanity to man” as Burns said. I, for one, am looking for a different answer. A way to assuage people’s insecurity, to recreate community, to reconnect individuals with each other and the wider world.

We all need to be more confident in ourselves, we all have something of significance to offer. None of us is worth less that anyone else. We can turn away from the negativity and nihilism of mainstream politics and media. We can invest in ourselves and Transition to a kinder, more supportive world.

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Mentally Well?

It’s mental health awareness week. It would be funny if it wasn’t so tragic. We have a government who seems to be quite happy to send it’s own citizens to the very depths of depression, even to suicide. And the government’s behaviour seems to be rooted in a total absence of empathy, which seems pathological in its completeness.

What to do? If we lived in a true democracy (a true democracy is where every one who has the right to vote, has the right to vote on every policy decision) then there would be ways we could vote against their insanity. But we don’t. As I have explained before we live in an elective dictatorship. In the recent past no government would dream of behaving the way the current Ca-moron band of chums are.

Lets go back to the origins of our political system. After the usual local structures of power we eventually ended up with a monarchy. Not a great political system, but a common one. We had one particular king who pissed his mates off big time. Eventually, after they had tried being reasonable with him, they strong armed him into signing what has become know as the Magna Carta. This was an agreement between the king and his lords.

This agreement is the root of our current political system. This is a problem because, it wasn’t about respecting ordinary people, it was about safeguarding the position of the already privileged. All through our history until very recent times the vast majority of laws passed by what became parliament, have been about keeping property safe, or about keeping money in the right person’s pocket.

There has been a certain amount of fairness built into the system, sometimes even intentionally. But the law in Britain has always left something to be desired as far as the unprivileged masses are concerned. Never more so than now.

We are entering uncertain times. Predictions of doomsayers from the 1970’s and 80’s are finally starting to look like they really are coming true. We really are starting to run out of oil. The world is poisoned and struggling to make enough pure air and water to keep the humans alive.

If we are to save anything we need to be acting in a proactive way. Putting improved (for our survival) systems in place. What we have is a reactionary government that is so scared of the world, they want to cocoon themselves in money, because that will make all the nastiness go away. They don’t realise that their own thinking is mentally unwell…

Democratic Britain… NOT – Part 1

Many people in Britain are proud of our democratic history. This is because of two things they have been misinformed about: British history; and, what democracy is.

Democracy is a political system where every eligible person is entitled, if not required, to vote about every political act undertaken in their name. This is not what happens in Britain.

We have what is called an “elective dictatorship”. Which means that every eligible person has the right to vote for someone who makes decisions for them. And, because of our system of constituencies, allied to “first past the post” voting, we very often end up with a government that does not represent the points of view of the majority of the population.

Not only that, they often do not have the welfare of the majority in their hearts. As far as I am aware, until the election of Caroline Lucas (who is not my MP), there has not been a member of parliament who even came close to representing my point of view.